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They patent an iPhone too strange to be true

They say that the old always comes back into fashion and that for some reason antique shops survive in our day, and surely if a phone like the one that was just patented had existed in the times of the Roman Empire, several emperors they would have wanted.

Because Apple got a patent for a roll-up iPhone. Yes, read it right, like those old parchments that folded and then were cylindrically stored.

Everything was discovered by Patently Apple, who describe a flexible device that could be rolled to its sides and integrated into covers that would be transparent and even with content that could be seen while closed and rolled up.

According to the publication, this iPhone “focuses on a scrollable device with a flexible screen that wraps around one or more rollers. In a stored position, the flexible display can be wound around a storage roller. Optional unfolding rollers can be used to help unfold the display as the display is removed from the housing. A flexible display can be seen through a transparent housing window before and after the flexible display is removed from the housing "

roll-up apple

The important thing about this new system: How do the “scrolls” work ?:

According to the patent, it is stated that, "the elongated bi-stable support members may run along the edges of the screen or may overlap by a central active area of ​​the screen to help harden and support the screen in position extended. The magnets can be used to skew the edge-mounted bi-stable support structures outward and thus help prevent a flexible, rolled-up screen from wrinkling. ”

On the other hand, this roll-up iPhone will have a first surface with a pixel matrix and a second opposite surface that will double as a protective layer and external cover when "the flexible screen overlaps the touch screen".

The patent granted by Apple 10,602,623 was originally filed in the fourth quarter of 2017 and released today by the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

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