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The drones will help recover Nepal after the earthquake

Nepal has suffered the worst earthquake in 80 years, which has left a figure of more than 10,000 dead. The decaying infrastructure of the Asian country has reached its breaking point and the first need at this time is rescue those who have been trapped Among the rubble. However, helicopters begin to become scarce, so it has been thought that drones will be able to play a fundamental role for the relief response in this natural disaster.

Yes, it seems that these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can bring great benefits since with their cameras they will be able to make tours of areas to leave the helicopters for rescue missions. Drones are valuable in different ways. A video captured with these devices of the devastation in Kathmandu has demonstrated its importance as a tool for telling stories.

Drones are also useful for collecting information and mapping disaster areas. UAVs are complementary tools since studies with traditional tactics such as manned airplanes or satellite images may take longer, in addition to being more difficult to carry out due to the terrain. Drones can travel between five and ten square kilometers in a matter of hours and show the results with a high resolution.

Weather is another important factor: small drones can move under the cloud layer that makes it difficult to see satellite images, a particular problem in Nepal where weather conditions have made it difficult to collect satellite images after the disaster.

The drones that are being used in Nepal have come from all over the world. India, for example, has announced the shipment of these to the disaster zone and the Canadian charity GlobalMedic has already sent one that has begun to fly over the affected areas. Other international teams of drone pilots are also heading to Nepal, where area surveys of qualified areas will be carried out as a priority by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs and UNICEF.

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