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Block of car controls in the city of Ohio

A device manufactured by a neighbor emitted signals that inhibited those sent by the wireless keys of vehicles and garages

A city of Ohio (USA)

The controls of multiple cars and garages ceased to function mysteriously. Overnight, several inhabitants of North Olmsted could not open the doors of their vehicles and garages.

But as he moved away from the area, the command worked again. Experts in garage door repair, electronics enthusiasts and workers from different companies approached there to try to find out what was happening.

Several days of investigations

They have already solved the mystery: a homemade device manufactured by a neighbor emitted a frequency that inhibited the signals of multiple controls in the area

This strange situation began at the end of April in this city on the outskirts of Cleveland of approximately 32,000 inhabitants.

Several officials then began to receive calls from more than a dozen affected people informing them of the problems with the wireless controls of their vehicles, as explained by Donald Glauner, director of security and services of the city.

Corinne Branchick

She is one of the affected neighbors, as she has told the Ohio Cleveland.com portal. He tried to close the door of his car three weeks ago with the remote. But it does not work.

"I thought it was my battery, so I bought a new one, although that didn't help me," He has affirmed.

Shortly after

He realized that the command did work when he went to work or anywhere else. He asked the neighbors of his street if they had also experienced problems.

And discovered that she was not alone. The same thing happened to ten residents on Virginia Avenue. Other affected people lived in the nearby streets Brendan Lane and MacBeth Lane and in the nearby city Farview Park.

But the ruling did not affect everyone

This was confirmed by Chris Branchick, who occasionally went to the city to visit his parents. When he used his vehicle, a GMC, the remote did not open the car door. But when he was in his girlfriend's Nissan, there was no problem.

They did a multitude of investigations and even thought that the problem came from the NASA Glenn Research Center or Cleveland Hopkins International Airport

North Olmsted Police

The authorities and even the radio frequency experts were baffled by the situation. Several people came with meters to the area to try to solve the mystery.

All agreed that some signal was interfering with the frequency on which many controls depended. But no one was able to find out where that strange signal came from.

They did a multitude of investigations and even thought that the problem came from the NASA Glenn Research Center or the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport. The research center is about four miles away – about 6 kilometers – while the airport is about five miles away – about 8 kilometers.

Several companies

They joined the search for answers. Businessmen from the telecommunications company AT&T and the local electricity company Illuminating Company sent inspectors to the area.

"They started turning off the power at the places where they detected the strongest reading for interfering radio frequencies," explained Chris Eck, a spokesman for the company to The New York Times

But even after disconnecting the power in a complete block, the frequency persisted.

Finally

They discovered what happened after going door to door in search of strange signals. Among the fans who approached the area to investigate, was Dan Dalessandro, a TV repairman; At first he only picked up “small signs”, but in one area and in a particular house, the signal was extraordinarily high.

Chris Glassburn

He announced last Saturday afternoon that the problem had been resolved. Behind the mystery, was the home device that a neighbor had invented to tell him that there was someone on the top floor of his house while he worked in the basement.

This device constantly emitted a 315 megahertz signal that inhibited the signals emitted by the remote controls of cars and garages.

"There was no malicious intention behind the device," Glassburn said in a statement that includes the same medium.

Both the inventor of the device and the rest of the people who lived in the same house had no idea that they were wreaking havoc in the neighborhood until Glassburn and a volunteer with experience in radio frequencies knocked on the door. When the battery was removed from the device, the signal stopped.

The architect of the same, whose identity has not been disclosed, has promised not to do more devices of this type in the future. And the neighbors of North Olmsted can now open and close the doors of their cars and garages with their remote controls.

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